🚽 LOS INODOROS

Antes de ver las fotos, mi predicción es que los inodoros del mundo son...

Italia

Japón
España
Los Estados Unidos
Alemania

Portugal

Sudáfrica
Austria
Uruguay
Australia

Letonia

Francia
Inglaterra

Canadá

Kuwait

Después de ver las fotos, mi observación es que...

❄️ LOS REFRIGERADORES

Antes de ver las fotos, mi predicción es que los refrigeradores del mundo son...

Italia

Japón
España
Los Estados Unidos
Alemania

Portugal

Sudáfrica
Austria

Canadá

Australia

Letonia

Francia
Inglaterra

Después de ver las fotos, mi observación es que...

📭 LOS BUZONES

Antes de ver las fotos, mi predicción es que los buzones alrededor del mundo son...

Italia

Japón
España
Los Estados Unidos
Alemania

Canadá

Sudáfrica

Austria

Uruguay

Australia
Francia
Inglaterra

Después de ver las fotos, mi observación es que...

🔌 los enchufes

Antes de ver las fotos, mi predicción es que los enchufes alrededor del mundo son...

Italia

Japón
España
Los Estados Unidos
Alemania

Portugal

Sudáfrica
Austria
Uruguay
Australia

Letonia

Francia
Inglaterra

Suiza

Kuwait

Malasia

OTRO

OTRO

Canadá

OTRO

Después de ver las fotos, mi observación es que...

💡 los apagadores de luz

Antes de ver las fotos, mi predicción es que los apagadores de luz alrededor del mundo son...

Italia

Japón
España
Los Estados Unidos
Alemania

Canadá

Sudáfrica

Malasia

Uruguay
Australia

Letonia

Francia

Suiza

Kuwait

Después de ver las fotos, mi observación es que...

< < < para los profes > > >

Prep: Use these pictures and ideas to engage students, compare cultures, and communicate.

 

Want to develop Intercultural Competence? Invite native speakers to your class to join the conversation. Encourage students to interact and compare culture with native speakers to see new perspectives and learn first-hand from others. 

Step 1: Daily Objective

By the end of this class, students should be able to talk about some differences among houses around the world.

Step 2: Have you ever visited a home in another country?

Give students an opportunity to share experiences with partners, small groups, or with the whole class.

Prompt them: 

Was the home similar to homes here or were there a lot of difference?

What was the biggest difference?

Step 3: Make a prediction

Before seeing pictures of toilets around the world, do students predict they will be pretty similiar or pretty different?

Novices… You read the options and let them raise their hand to “vote”.

Intermediates… let them give their opinion with a partner or small group and explain why. 

 

Step 4: Compare

Look at the images together as a class. Ask them if they want to see more or any specific image. (That helps them practice saying the countries names in the target language.) Click on any image to expand it and see more detail. 

Which country is the most different to what you are used to?

Which countries are very similar to what you are used to?

 

Step 5: Make an observation

Were the photos more alike than they expected OR more different? 

Let them vote or go around the class so they can share their thoughts. 

Which country was the most unique? 

What other evidence of culture (decoration, color, design) do they notice in the photos?

Step 5: Repeat

Move on to the next set of photos and let them predict, compare, and make an observation. 

Check for Learning

Give them an open-ended prompt for them to respond to at their proficiency level.

Reflect on what you saw today. What did you notice? How do homes compare around the world?

Thank you to all who shared photos!

Pam Benton (Japan)

 Andrea Suarez (Uruguay)

Jeanine Janse van Rensburg (South Africa)

Candis Carey (Austria)

Robbye Simon Griet (France, Portugal)

 

 

Bethanie Drew (Spain)

Christina Calderón (Ecuador)

Steve Liddell (Australia)

Katrin Scheuble Pope (Germany)

Joanny Billings (England)

Raquel Parra (Malaysia)

Cory McDowell (Kuwait)

Svetlana Ries (Latvia)

Joanie Nadeau (Canada)

 

Share your resources and ideas with the community below!

8 Comments

  1. Samantha Page

    I like the idea of this lesson, but I’m having trouble imagining this going well with my Novice High level learners (8th grade) or even filling a whole class period. I feel like at my students’ proficiency level, they can’t really describe any household item with much detail. So I feel like it would be just me showing them pictures and talking about which are most similar/which are most different…

    Reply
    • Megan Smith

      Might not be a big day of them PRODUCING language if they are novices, but it could be a neat way for them to consider perspectives (which is part of our standards) and possibly break down stereotypes. Try it as a mini-lesson: maybe 20 mins. Let students do their reflection in English if you need to. It might be a really fun thing for them to see!

      Reply
  2. amykeup

    These are incredible and so powerful! Given Virtual teaching right now, it would be nice to share these images with students to reflect on culturally. Is it possible to somehow share these images with students on a slideshow or via Google Classroom?

    Reply
    • Megan Smith

      Amy – Glad you like the images! Neat to see around the world in one spot isn’t it?
      Since you asked – I made a copy of the page (without the teacher info) and opened it up for you to share the link with students. Here it is: https://www.adiostextbook.com/casas/diferencias-2/

      We’d love to hear how it goes!

      Reply
      • amykeup

        Thank you so much!!!!! Very much appreciated!!! Amazing resources!

        Reply
  3. Christina Ahmed

    This lesson and unit looks amazing! I do see that the light switch for England is missing, is it just me?

    Reply
    • Megan Smith

      Not just you… Sorry! The teacher who shared picture from England didn’t include that one. I kept it as a placeholder until I got another one, but I’ll take it out for now so it’s not confusing!

      Reply

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